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FAMILY BAT WATCH

BATTY ABOUT BATS?         BOOK NOW!
6.30 - 7.30 pm on Saturday 29th September
(Bad weather? Alternative date Sat. 6th October)

NB The exact finish time will depend on how successful we are and weather conditions

Come and see how many of the nine species of bat that have been found living in Richmond Park we can find

Children attending will have an opportunity to learn how to use a bat detector. Attendees should be at least 5 years old

Please request places on the Bat Watch on our event registration page no later than Friday 21st September

This event is very popular so is open to members of FRP only.  There is no charge, but a donation to the London Bat Group would be welcomed. (Suggested donation is £5 per family).
Non-members are welcome to join at a cost £15.00 per house-hold (annual subscription). Details are here (or see below)

Event Details

SOME FACTS ABOUT BATS

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A common noctule bat

Bats must be one of the most misunderstood animals in all Nature!

Many people are frightened of them and there are a number of myths and much ignorance about these fascinating and intelligent little creatures.

How many of the following statements are true?

Answer - none of them are true!

What is true is that because of urbanisation and changes affecting their habitats bats are threatened and endangered, and are now protected in the UK. It is illegal to interfere with their roosts in any way. If you have bats under your roof or in your neighbourhood, consider yourself very fortunate - they will do no harm!

Here are some true facts about bats

For more information about bats go to
The London Bat Group site http://www.londonbats.org.uk/.
The Bat Conservation Trust http://www.bats.org.uk
National Bat Monitoring Programme http://www.bats.org.uk/pages/nbmp.html

 

WHICH BATS MIGHT WE SEE IN THE PARK?

Nine species are known to occur in the Park. The ones we should definitely see are soprano pipistrelle, common pipistrelle and Daubenton's bat.

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A common pipistrelle

Pipistrelles

The UK’s smallest bat with a wingspan 19-25 cm. These are bats you are most likely to see in built-up areas, emerging from roosts soon after dusk. There are a number of species – e.g. common, Soprano and Nathusias’ pipistrelle.

Daubenton’s Bat

A medium-sized bat with a wing span of 24-27cm. It is sometimes called the water bat because it swoops in low foraging flights over ponds, lakes, rivers and canals. It mainly roosts in trees.

We may also see the noctule (the UK’s largest bat with a 32-40cm wingspan). They feed in open areas near lakes and rivers. Noctules are thought to be in decline, though they are still widespread in Greater London. Other species found in the Park are Leisler's bat, Brown long-eared bat and Natterer's bat. Another - the Serotine- is a rare visitor.

HOW DO WE DETECT AND IDENTIFY BATS IN THE DARK?

The best way is to use a bat detector. Bats emit high frequency calls normally beyond the range of human hearing to build up a sound picture of their surroundings as they hunt insects. A bat detector makes these echo location calls audible to humans, and different bat species make different calls which helps identify them. You will learn how to use a bat detector on the Bat Watch!

For more information, you can contact us at discoverers@frp.org.uk

For details of how to join the Friends of Richmond Park, go to http://www.frp.org.uk/friends/get-involved/